Why Solar Energy

Why Solar Energy

Why Solar Energy
The demand for energy has always been the primary driving force in the development of industrial capability. The invention of the steam engine sparked the industrial revolution and the consequent evolution of an energy economy based on wood and coal. Since then the continuous growth of the energy economy has focused on various sources of energy, such as nuclear, wind, water, oil, and gas. Nuclear energy is very expensive and poses radiation hazards and nuclear waste problems. Electrical energy sources using coal, wood, gas, and oil generate large amounts of pollution or carbon dioxide emissions, thereby posing health risks. All these electrical energy power sources require large capital investments and scheduled maintenance. In case of coal-fired power plants, high capital investment, coal transportation cost, and delivery delay under adverse climatic conditions could pose serious problems. On the other hand, a solar energy source provides pollution-free, self-contained, reliable, quiet, long-term, maintenance-free, and year-round continuous and unlimited operation at moderate costs. Despite all these benefits of solar cells and nearly 55 years after their invention, PV solar cells are generating only 0.04 percent of the world鈥檚 on-grid electricity due to the high cost of solar cells, which is beyond the reach of the common consumer. Based on the 2007 statistical review of world energy consumption, 30 percent of the electrical energy is generated from coal, 16 percent from natural gas, 15 percent from water generators, 9 percent from oil, 4 percent from nuclear reactors, and only 1 percent from solar cells. In the United States, solar energy of all kinds fulfills less than 0.1 percent of the electrical demand. All industrial and Western countries such as the United States, Germany, Japan, Brazil, Italy, Spain, and other European countries are turning to electrical power generation from solar cells, because of the high capital investments, radiation, and carbon dioxide emissions associated with coal-based, nuclear-based, gas-based, and oil-based power plants.